It’s Almost Fair Oaks Fiesta Time

By Dot Boyd, Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce  |  2017-03-22

Spring has sprung and the Fair Oaks Chamber is getting all of its chickens in a row, for the 68th Annual Fair Oaks Fiesta! Join us on Sunday, May 7th, from 9 am to 4 pm to enjoy a fun, family day in Fair Oaks Village! If you’ve been before, you know that it’s a day chock-full of fun, starting with the Fair Oaks Sun Run (before 9 am), www.fairoakssunrun.com, the Pancake Breakfast put on by the Orangevale-Fair Oaks Grange, and the dazzling Classic Car Show with some 300 classic beauties on display. You sure don’t want to miss the hilarious Toilet Bowl Race and the crowning of Miss Fair Oaks. Do you know a girl, aged 15-19 who either lives in or goes to school in Fair Oaks who has a heart for leadership and a desire to serve as an Ambassador of her community? If so, be sure she knows to submit her application no later than March 29th. Please visit www.fairoakschamber.com for entry details. This is not a beauty contest and a scholarship is attached. But wait, there’s even more! There will be children’s activities, live music and performances, arts and crafts vendors, shopping and dining in The Village, food trucks and all-around fun for all.

Then before you know it, June will be here and the 24th Annual A Taste of Fair Oaks will take place on Friday, June 9th, from 6 pm to 9:30 pm. You don’t want to miss this festive, fun-filled evening of wine & craft beer tasting, gourmet food sampling, live and silent auction items, music, classic cars and more! Get your tickets early. No tickets sales at the door.

See you in Fair Oaks!


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Seeking the Next Miss Fair Oaks

From Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce  |  2017-03-22

We Are Looking for the next Miss Fair Oaks.  Do you want to get involved in the Fair Oaks Community? If you would like to become or know a young lady who be a good representative for our city see below:

Become our Fair Oaks “Good Will Ambassador” and have the experience of a lifetime!

The Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce is now accepting applications for Miss Fair Oaks 2017-18. The Deadline for applications is Wednesday, March 29.  The new Miss Fair Oaks will be crowned during the Fair Oaks Fiesta on May 7.

Applications can be downloaded from the F.O. Chamber website at fairoakschamber.com or picked up at the Chamber office, 10014 Fair Oaks Blvd.  (916- 967-2903). Miss Fair Oaks Chair is Ronda Leuty at 916- 521-4993. Application Fee $50.

Applicants must live in or go to school in Fair Oaks. Applicants must be 15 to 19 years of age. No prior experience is necessary.

Here is also what Audrey Nunez, our Miss Fair Oaks Ambassador, runner up for Miss Fair Oaks in 2017, said about her experience. (The Miss Fair Oaks runner up becomes Miss Fair Oaks Ambassador.) “Being able to represent such an amazing city is what I have strived for ever since I joined pageants. I love Fair Oaks and all the amazing people who work so hard to keep it beautiful. Being Miss Fair Oaks Ambassador I have been able to create a group of amazing friends and be a part of something very special.”


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River Cats Take on San Jose Giants at Raley Field

Source: Sacramento River Cats  |  2017-03-22

The Sacramento River Cats are excited to announce a cross-level scrimmage against the San Jose Giants, the class-A affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. The two teams will go head-to-head in a scrimmage at Raley Field on Wednesday, April 5, just one day before Sacramento’s Opening Day. Tickets for the game start at just $5 and are available now at www.rivercats.com.

This pre-season scrimmage is an extension of Spring Training and is likely to feature many of San Francisco’s top prospects. Christian Arroyo and Tyler Beede – the system’s top two prospects – are expected to take the field for the River Cats while 2016 first-round pick Bryan Reynolds (No. 4 prospect) may start for the San Jose squad.  Other prospects likely to be involved in the game include Joan Gregorio (No. 7), Jalen Miller (No. 15), Heath Quinn (No. 17), and Sacramento fan-favorite Austin Slater (No. 22).

First pitch on Wednesday, April 5 at Raley Field is set for 6:05 pm. Gates for the game will open at 5:00 pm with parking lots to open at 4:30 pm. Parking will be $5.

General admission tickets start at just $5. There will be a $10 ticket option which includes a general admission ticket, a hot dog, chips, and a soda. Tickets can be purchased online at www.rivercats.com.

All River Cats season ticket members will have tickets to the exhibition game included with their plan. For more information please email tickets@rivercats.com or call (916) 376-HITS (4487).


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Board Approves Homelessness Reduction Initiatives

Source: Sacramento County Media Department  |  2017-03-22

Some of the proposed system would simplify access to shelter entry and maximize bed utilization.

On March 21st, 2017, the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved four initiatives to reduce homelessness with the intent to improve the family homelessness sheltering system; support the strategic use of transitional housing; establish a low-barrier Full Service Rehousing Shelter, and implement a new supportive Rehousing program that will employ intensive case management and Rehousing supports in conjunction with dedicated Public Housing Authority housing resources.

County Initiative #1, to Redesign Family Homelessness Response and Shelter System seeks to modify contracts to require family shelter to prioritize unsheltered families, establish low barrier requirements, mandate family acceptance of housing services and exit most families to permanent housing within 45 days. The proposed system would simplify access to shelter entry and maximize bed utilization.

With County Initiative #2, Preservation of Mather Community Campus (MCC) Residential and Employment Program, the County would provide replacement funding to continue transitional housing and employment programs at MCC for 183 single adults experiencing homelessness when HUD Continuum of Care funding sunsets on September 30, 2017.

With County Initiative #3, Full Service Rehousing Shelter, the primary purpose of the shelter is to serve those with the highest barriers to traditional services and shelter. Staff proposed that the County fund a local provider to open a 24-hour, low-barrier Full Service Rehousing Shelter designed to shelter and rapidly re-house persons who are difficult to serve in traditional shelters or services. Stable exit will be the primary objective of on-site case management.

County Initiative #4, Flexible Supportive Rehousing Program, would employ a “frequent utilizer” approach to targeting the highest cost users experiencing homelessness to identify eligible participants. The Program would provide a highly flexible solution, employing proactive engagement, “whatever it takes services”, and ongoing housing subsidies to engage and stably re-house the target population.

Today’s report to the Board provided implementation milestones and timeframes, essentially a “roadmap” to reduce homelessness. Comprehensive efforts to reduce homelessness have been augmented in the last year:

On October 18, 2016, the Board held a workshop on homelessness: “Homelessness Crisis Response: Investing in What Works.”

A second workshop was held on November 15, 2016, called “Increasing Permanent Housing Opportunities for Persons Experiencing Homelessness.”

On January 24, 2017, County staff presented a comprehensive package of strategic recommendations to improve outcomes for people experiencing homelessness.

On January 31, 2017, the Board of Supervisors and the Sacramento City Council held a joint workshop on homelessness.

On February 28, 2017, the County hosted a stakeholder meeting with approximately 60 persons in attendance representing 36 organizations to help shape the initiatives.

Department of Human Assistance Director, Ann Edwards, stated, “I am excited about the Board’s commitment to taking these steps to reduce homelessness in our community.”


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Hit and Run Suspect Sought by CHP

Shelly Lembke  |  2017-03-16

Screen-capture of CHP Hit and Run suspect.

East Sacramento CHP and Rancho Cordova PD are requesting public assistance with identifying a possible hit and run vehicle involved in a fatal collision on February 23, 2017, at approximately  8:13 pm.  The collision occurred on northbound Sunrise Boulevard north of Coloma Road.  The make and model of the vehicle has been identified as a 2002-2009 Dodge RAM 1500, equipped with a light colored or metallic toolbox, mounted directly behind the cab.

The driver of the pickup may be a white or Hispanic male, approximately 5'08" to 6'00" tall, between 190 and 225 pounds.  At the time, the driver was wearing blue jeans and a bright colored hoody style sweater, according to CHP Public Information Officer Tommy Riggin.

For CHP-provided video of the suspect, click here: https://cfs.chp.ca.gov/cfs/public.php?service=files&t=d6f342dd9ad5772d146ac9fcb06a5374&download

If anyone has any information regarding the identity of the driver and/or vehicle, please contact the East Sacramento CHP Area Office at (916) 464-1450, or the public information officer at (916) 802-5372.  
"Any assistance that you can provide is greatly appreciated," said Riggin.
 

 


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Church Members Serve in Nicaragua

Submitted by Richard Cable All photos courtesy Eventide Community   |  2017-03-16

Providing solar ovens in Las Huertas.

A delegation of 18 members of the Sacramento Presbytery, ages 14 to over 70, spent spring break volunteering in Nicaragua. The team is a part of an ongoing partnership with CEPAD, an Ecumenical, Not for Profit serving the people of Nicaragua by building schools and supporting sustainability in its villages.

The volunteer team began their service at a CEPAD School in the colonial city of León. The team painted three classrooms but the highlight was presenting the school with 18 laptop computers generously donated by members of Davis Community Church.

“When the computers were first presented, there was a lot of confused chatter,” stated Rev. Jeanie Shaw, pastor of Eventide Community − a sister church to Grace Presbyterian in Sacramento − and mission trip leader, “the students had never seen a laptop before. After a student yelled out, 'Computadora,' [computers!] the whole assembly erupted in gleeful pandemonium.”

“Nicaragua is the second poorest country in our hemisphere,” said Dr. Grace Chou of Tahoe Donner and a mission volunteer, “and to empower these students with technology was the gift of a lifetime.” Dr. Chou also took the task of installing the computers for the school.

The team then visited the District of San Fransico Libre, a high desert region that ranks the poorest in the Nicaraguan. They visited the small village of Las Huertas where the entire village gathered at the home of their community leader and welcomed us.

“The village is comprised of only 29 families,” Pastor Shaw describes. “Their one and two room houses are handmade of adobe or cement blocks. Cooking is done over firewood in outdoor clay ovens. Floors are just packed earth.”

The village has no refrigeration or running water. Electricity was only introduced last year. And domestic animals roam freely everywhere; cows, chickens, turkeys, pigs, and dogs. Cattle are driven down the road twice a day led by men on horseback. Oxcarts take loads of firewood to sell into other nearby villages. But everything is clean in Las Huertas, dirt yards swept every day at dawn.

The leaders of the village had chosen water collection as the primary project this year and the Truckee team provided 8 families with large cisterns, tubing for gutters on the houses and plastic sheeting for a large catch pond for collecting water during the rainy season. The team also provided tools for the village and together with the villagers, dug out the collecting ponds.

As a pilot project, the team also brought five solar ovens and demonstrated how they worked to the villagers.

“There was real excitement when they learned that their rice would never burn again,” Shaw said.

“Nicaragua is a culture with beautiful formality,” Dr. Chou observed. “We were presented with beautiful, yet formal, welcome speeches and prayers.”

Spencer Edmundson and Jack and Tiege Wright of Truckee gave the Nicaraguan youth enough baseball equipment for the whole village and a game immediately got underway. Baseball is their national past time and the boys were quickly led to a sugar cane field where the villagers, wielding machetes, cut down the cane to make a baseball diamond. Ash from fire pits were spread to mark the lines and they yelled, “¡Jugar a la pelota!” [Play Ball!] Teams were chosen, and our youth pitched and their youth batted the balls skyward (almost lost in the sugarcane). Afterward, the laughter and high fives between teams needed no translation.

“We come from two different countries,” Shaw said in a formal thank you, “but we are all Americans − North Americans and South Americans. And most importantly, we are all one in Christ.”

The Mission Team shared their reflections of their experience on Sunday, March 12th at Eventide Community within the Fellowship Hall of the Arden Christian Church in Sacramento.


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A Real Person Behind the Relay

By Shelly Lembke  |  2017-03-16

Hundreds of participants celebrate at Relay for Life events. Relays are open to all: the public, cancer survivors, caregivers and anyone whose life or heart has been touched by this disease.

Each year members of local communities gather together to participate in the Relay for Life, sponsored by the American Cancer Society. Each event has a local coordinator. The American River Relay for Life is coordinated by Tamika Stove. Stove first became involved with Relay for Life as a volunteer, but found it so rewarding that she stayed with it and now works year-round to promote the event.

Describing herself as “easy going and caffeinated,” Stove puts in long days working for the American Cancer Society, but finds time to be part of Rotary Club and the Citrus Heights Chamber of Commerce, where she has served both as a Chamber ambassador and as a board member. Her passion for community service is simply part of who she is. Being involved is the way she lives her life. “I feel like I’m part of the world around me,” she said of her work. “It makes me feel good. That’s a powerful thing.”

Relay for Life began in 1985 when Tacoma, Washington doctor Gordon Klatt walked and ran over 80 miles around a track in a single 24-hour period. Today’s relays last between six and 24 hours. Dr. Klatt’s desire was to raise money to aid the American Cancer Society (ACS) in their quest for a cure.

Following Dr. Klatt’s example, the ACS continues to utilize monies raised by the event to fund cancer research, services for the public and cancer patients, speakers and more, all as part of their mission to find a cure and increase awareness about this disease that touches so many around the world.

Stove puts a year into planning each Relay for Life event. She does constant community outreach, happily taking time to answer questions, provide support and recruit volunteers. There are ample opportunities for involvement, she says, and no matter the size of the contribution, whether in the form of time or money, she is enthusiastic, grateful and gracious to have all the help she can get.

Relay for Life relies on all forms of help from the community. There are corporate sponsors of all sizes, from small businesses to large firms. Volunteers can form teams to walk during the event to show support or individuals can show up the day of the event and help with something simple, such as handing out bottled water or setting up the event’s famous luminarias.

Each Relay for Life is a public event and open to all, per Stove. Her ongoing challenges of recruiting volunteers, plus the planning and execution of each Relay, do not deter her in the least. She began her work with the Relay for Life as an ordinary volunteer, donating about an hour a week to making phone calls and distributing flyers.

Her deep commitment to community involvement was fostered early in life. Growing up as the daughter of a dad serving in the United States Air Force, Stove learned about dedication and working for the public good. As a “military brat,” she also became accustomed to moving and finding her place in her new communities. “It helped me value relationships,” she said. Stove works hard to foster those relationships each day in dealing with the public and spreading the word about Relay for Life and the mission of the ACS.

This year’s American River Relay for Life will be held April 22- 23, beginning at 9 a.m. and lasting 24 hours. The event will be hosted at San Juan High School at 7551 Greenback Lane in Citrus Heights and begin with Opening Ceremonies, followed by a Survivor Lap for anyone having been diagnosed, a Caregiver Lap and then by teams on the track. Each time keeps a member on the track always because, as the ACS says, “Cancer never sleeps.” When participants are not on the track there are games, entertainment and activities provided to promote awareness and education about the fight against cancer. Nightfall signals the lighting of the luminaria45s to commemorate the lives that have been lost and celebrate those who have survived cancer, as well as to provide a literal light in the darkness and remind people they are not alone when it comes to this disease. The Relay wraps up with recognizing the work of the volunteers themselves.

For more information on this year’s American Rive Relay for Life, contact Tamika Stove at tamika.stove@cancer.org or americanriverrelay@gmail.com or visit the American Cancer Society’s website at www.acsevents.org.


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