SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CA (MPG) - On Jan. 15, the Board of Supervisors approved a collaborative partnership between Sacramento County and UC Davis Health to deliver primary care, behavioral health, and some specialty services to 5,000 Medi-Cal enrollees at the County-run Federally Qualified Health Center at Broadway and Stockton Boulevard.

“Sacramento County is thrilled for this relationship with UC Davis Health,” said Supervisor Patrick Kennedy. “Together we are committed to ensuring greater access to high-quality health care in our region. UC Davis Health already provides health care services at the Sacramento County Health Center and the expansion will allow for more access to primary care and high-quality health care to Medi-Cal patients.”

Starting Feb. 1, the partnership will bring together a hospital system and Sacramento County health care providers to give coordinated, high-quality care to patients. The unique structure of the agreement is based on that of an Accountable Care Organization, where UC Davis Health provides all care for primary care and behavioral health services for enrollees at the Paul F. Hom Primary Care Facility in the Sacramento County Health Center as well as at UC Davis facilities.

“Patients will be phased in over a period of six months to the​ Paul F. Hom Primary Care Facility in the Sacramento County Health Center,” said Peter Beilenson, Director of the Department of Health Services. “These enrollees will be provided with comprehensive primary care and behavioral health services, but will also have opportunities to connect with on-site social service organizations that provide housing assistance, job placement, legal se​rvices, Medi-Cal system navigation and eligibility, and care coordination.”

This collaborative initiative has great potential for all involved:

  • For patients and community members - primary and preventive care to Medi-Cal recipients who currently have limited access to care in the County will be increased and more coordinated
  • For the Sacramento County Health Center and Sacramento County - the Health Center will be fully utilized and serve the ultimate vision of a person-centered medical and social service home for an underserved community with increased reimbursement for services provided. 

Source: Sacramento County Media

...Read More!  
  |  

Sacramento Life Center Baby Basket Drive Raises $10K To Help New Moms

By Kristin Thébaud  |  2019-03-06

Ana Alvarado receives a baby basket from Sacramento Life Center, thanks to the group’s Baby Basket Drive held each December. Photo courtesy Thébaud Communications

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - The Sacramento Life Center’s fifth annual Baby Basket Drive for new moms raised more than $10,000 from the community in December, which will buy more than 200 baskets for Sacramento Life Center patients throughout 2019. The drive is held each December to kickstart the 500 baby baskets needed so that every Sacramento Life Center patient who gives birth in the coming year can receive a basket of needed items, including formula, diapers, newborn clothes, pacifiers and more.

Donations will be accepted throughout 2019 and can be made online at www.saclife.org by writing Baby Basket Drive in the message box on the donation page. Gifts can be made in any increment, but a donation of $50 buys one basket.

“One of the most overwhelming feelings is learning that you’re pregnant and fearing you won’t have the resources to care for your vulnerable baby,” said Marie Leatherby, executive director, Sacramento Life Center. “Sometimes something as simple as a gift of diapers and newborn clothes can give expecting mothers the confidence that they have a support system to help raise their child. These baskets give expecting mothers proof that they will always have a family here at the Sacramento Life Center and supporters out in the community rooting for their family.”

The Sacramento Life Center’s mission is to offer compassion, support, resources and free medical care to women and couples facing an unplanned or unsupported pregnancy. The Sacramento Life Center’s licensed Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic includes a primary clinic and two Mobile Medical Clinics that provide all services for free, including pregnancy tests, STD tests, ultrasounds, peer counseling for men and women, education and resource referrals. The nonprofit also offers a school-based teen education program, a 24-hour hotline and a program for women experiencing reproductive grief. For more information about the Sacramento Life Center’s Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic, visit www.svpclinic.com. For more information about the Sacramento Life Center or to make a donation, visit www.saclife.org

 

Source: Thébaud Communications

...Read More!  
  |  

Rachel Anne Gray Memorial Scholarship Recipients Named

Story by Shaunna Boyd  |  2019-03-05

Kobe Huynh, a senior at Bella Vista High School, was awarded $1,500.

FAIR OAKS, CA (MPG) - Each year, the Fair Oaks Recreation and Park District (FORPD) selects deserving high school juniors or seniors to receive the Rachel Anne Gray Memorial Scholarship.

Recipients of the scholarship are selected based on service to the community and personal achievement, and the 2019 recipients are Kobe Huynh, Nicole Hensley, Cerys McLean, Riley Day, and Macey McAdams.

The Rachel Anne Gray Memorial Scholarship was established to honor the memory of Rachel Anne Gray, who passed away at the age of 21 on September 2, 2012. Gray made a significant impact on young leaders as a member of the Fair Oaks Youth Advisory Board (FOYAB) from 2006 through 2008, and she was a valued member of the Fair Oaks community. She graduated from Bella Vista High School in 2008 and went on to study at California State University Sacramento, earning a degree in International Business.

This is the sixth year of the Rachel Anne Gray Memorial Scholarship program, and over $15,000 has been awarded to youth in Fair Oaks. Mary Cattolica, FORPD senior recreation leader, explained the selection process: “The scholarship focuses heavily on community involvement and service. The students who apply give a speech to the selection committee comprised of our staff as well as members of Rachel’s family.” Although students are required to hold a minimum 3.0 GPA to be eligible for selection, the scholarship is not based on academic achievement, nor is it a need-based scholarship. Students are eligible for selection if they are a Fair Oaks resident, a student of a Fair Oaks school, or a member of FOYAB.

FOYAB, which is organized and supported by the FORPD, is a youth leadership program that serves in an advisory capacity to the District’s Board of Directors. It allows the youth of Fair Oaks to participate in the development of District programs and provides them the opportunity to help shape the community in which they live. Members of FOYAB work to promote the Rachel Anne Gray Memorial Scholarship Foundation, helping to raise money for the scholarship fund to and continue Gray’s enduring legacy in Fair Oaks.

...Read More!  
  |  

Fresh Start's Role is to Support and Encourage

Story and photos by Trina L. Drotar  |  2019-03-05

Charlotte Stott and Melinda Avey display a starter kit offered by the Assistance League program.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) – In 2018, Assistance League Sacramento, an all-volunteer organization of over 285 members, celebrated 50 years of service to the local community through a variety of philanthropic programs that are funded in large part by its resale thrift shop, Fabulous Finds on Fulton. Programs, which are completely local, date back to 1967 when Eyes Right was established. At least one new program has been launched in each decade since. The organization’s newest programs, Fresh Start and Reaching Out, were established in 2017.

Charlotte Stott chairs the Fresh Start committee of 50 volunteers. After reviewing several studies on community needs, which included support for victims of sex trafficking and foster youth aging out of residential care, the group chose to partner with Community Against Sexual Harm (CASH) and its RESET diversion program. The program supports training and offers peer mentoring through its eight week, no fee program.

Stott explained that Fresh Start’s role is to support and encourage the women participating in the program. At four weeks, the midway point, women receive a “way to go gift” of lip balm, hand sanitizer, and a note. Upon graduation, women receive a bag with earrings, lipstick, and acknowledgement of their effort. The gifts, Stott said, tell the women that they matter.

 Fresh Start also assists by providing hygiene products and a change of clothing including sweat pants, bra, and a top. Three apartment starter kits are provided each quarter, and this month, the volunteers began providing bags with various items including tissues.

 “We provide small birthday gifts and cards hand signed by committee volunteers,” said Stott.

To assist foster youth aging out of the system, Fresh Start provides apartment starter kits to EA Family Services and Aspiranet. According to the latter’s website, 5000 youth age out annually in California and the agency supports 1900 by collaborating with community organizations like Assistance League Sacramento. Fresh Start plans to begin providing newborn essentials to young mothers who are in foster care.

Relationships were built and established and Stott estimates that approximately 6000 people have been touched in one way or another through the efforts of Fresh Start.

Reaching Out, a smaller committee of volunteers chaired by Melinda Avey, also provides apartment starter kits, along with a host of other assistance through its collaboration with Sacramento Steps Forward, an organization committed to ending homelessness in the region through partnerships with agencies such as Assistance League.

  “We buy work boots,” said Avey. “We pay deposit and application fees. We identify small needs.”

Sacramento Steps Forward, through partnerships with other organizations, may be able to secure housing for a currently homeless individual or family, but there are additional needs that they cannot provide. These, Avey explained, are the items that Reaching Out can assist with on short notice, such as the need for an application fee for a currently available apartment. When a request comes in, the committee votes to grant the request and Avey said, “makes it happen.”

 “That is the benefit of being a non-profit, we can act immediately.”

Like Fresh Start, Reaching Out also provides apartment starter kits. Kits, Avey said contain sheets, towels, pots and pans, shower curtain and rings, and other items that most folks might take for granted.

“We give a welcome mat,” she said, and the committee provides a clock. People living on the street lose track of time, she said.

Feedback, said Avey, always includes mention of the welcome mat. Items are not random choices. The committee is guided by suggestions regarding sheet size and table settings that are requested to be for one or two, not four.

The committee has also paid for a ticket to reunite a homeless individual and her father.

“It makes our day.”

For additional information, visit Assistance League Center’s Fabulous Find s on Fulton shop at 2751 Fulton Avenue or https://www.assistanceleague.org/Sacramento.

...Read More!  
  |  

Button Show Coming March 9

By Susan Maxwell Skinner  |  2019-02-22

Faye Wolfe (left) and Susan Rhoades display some of thousands of antique and retro buttons that will be exhibited at the California Button Society’s March 9 show. Photo by Susan Skinner

CARMICHAEL, CA  (MPG)  -  Some eye-popping antiques slip easily through a buttonhole. At the California Button Society’s March 9 expo, you might snag a Civil War tunic fastener for $50. If you lust for hand-painted 18th century pieces, be prepared to unbutton your billfold.  

What astonishes at such bazaars is the availability of seriously old stuff. Snipped from long-ago rotted garments, many are thumb-nail masterpieces. “We often look at old buttons and imagine the stories they could tell,” says Button Club treasurer Susan Rhoades. “They were traded, stolen and inherited. Lives were lost in making them; pearl dust and mercury (for gold plating) killed many. “You learn so much about history, art and manufacturing from buttons.”

In the Middle Ages, no material was too grand for the button makers’ art. Georgian aristocrats later bespoke Gainsborough-style portraits – sometimes of their pets – to fasten vests. When Queen Victoria took to wearing jet specimens, society followed. Though zippers have revolutionized modern fastening, nifty little buttons have never been completely undone. “People visit our shows show seeking that one perfect item,” says Sacramento collector Faye Wolfe. “One lady brought a vest she’d sewn; she wanted buttons for it. In the end, she chose four, each different. Who says they have to match? Our button world is full of eccentricity.”

The Button Bazaar runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 9, at the La Sierra Center, 5325 Engle Rd, Carmichael. The show offers a free service for valuing buttons. Admission is by $2 donation. For information, contact fwolfe@surewest.net

...Read More!  
  |  

Happy Birthday Mr. President

Story and photos by Susan Maxwell Skinner  |  2019-02-22

Honest Abe and First lady Mary Lincoln – represented by lookalikes Guy Derby and Roberta Zanolli -- were among VIPs at Mount Vernon Memorial Park’s annual celebration of American heritage.

A Heritage Celebration Event

FAIR OAKS, CA (MPG) - Two beloved US presidents and their first ladies were  joined this week by frontiersmen, Buffalo Soldiers, colonial infantry and a huge sampling of Americana at Mount Vernon Memorial Park in Fair Oaks. The annual event celebrates Presidents’ Day.

A chime from a Liberty Bell replica began hours of reenactments and educational opportunities. While prospectors panned for gold, nimble-fingered ladies demonstrated the genteel art of lace-making. Abraham Lincoln introduced “my wife, Mary” and George Washington presented a sedate Martha to hundreds of visitors.

Pony Express recruiters were on hand seeking “Young, skinny, wiry fellows… willing to risk death daily.” Activities were loudly punctuated by the firing of an antique Howitzer cannon, provided Sierra Nevada Mormon Pioneer volunteers. For a warmer and more fuzzy experience, children were encouraged to pet the baby goats that represented milk and meat to many early pioneer farmers.

Heritage Day’s historical cast was augmented by US Army officers and a Huey Vietnam helicopter. “It came on a trailer,” explains Mount Vernon manager Lisa Goudy. “Its active days are over but, for the kids who got to sit in the cockpit, a Huey is still exciting.”

The free event aims to bring history to life and honor US presidents. “It was a perfect day for everyone,” reports Goudy. “Everyone enjoyed the part they played, from our two presidents to the baby goats.”

Mount Vernon Memorial Park is located at 8201 Greenback Lane. For information on next year’s commemoration, call (916) 9691251.

...Read More!  
  |  

A Carmichael Hero

Words and pictures Susan Maxwell Skinner  |  2019-02-13

Jack and Jerry Pefley. The couple

Carmichael Boy Through and Through -- Jack Pefley Dies, 95

CARMICHAEL, CA (MPG) - A warrior for his nation, his God, his family and his community, Jack Pefley died last month at the age of 95.

Founding one of Carmichael’s oldest clans, his parents and grandparents arrived in with the first wave of colony pioneers in 1910. Town founder Daniel Carmichael sold the family its 10 acres on California Ave. Born in 1923 at 12 pounds, 8 oz, Jack was the third child of Harold and Nellie Pefley. An infant moniker, “the wee one,” stuck all his life.

Jack and siblings Richard and Barbara were rough-and-tumble country kids during the great Depression. They hiked a daily mile to Carmichael School and later, six miles to San Juan High. Community matriarchs Mary Deterding and Effie Yeaw were near neighbors. The children studied psalms at Carmichael Presbyterian (then Carmichael Community Church) each Sunday.

During WW II, Jack followed his brother into uniform. Thus began a 25-year naval career from which he retired as a Commander. Jack claimed he favored the Navy over the Army because he craved “three hot meals a day and no sleeping in mud.” A lifetime passion for aviation began as he learned to fly amphibious craft off Donner Lake.  The farm boy’s extraordinary skill was soon noted. Called an “absolute artist” in the cockpit, he saw action in the Philippines, Japan, Korea. He later dog-fought with Russian MIGs in the Cold War.

During his Korean deployment, he was hailed for getting every war-wounded passenger off a downed PBM Mariner while “working the pedals” to keep the amphibian afloat. He then managed to re-fly and save the aircraft. Asked how he managed, Pefley replied “I’m a Carmichael farm boy and I know how drive a tractor.”

His service continued during peacetime as a Navy test pilot. He mastered jets and survived several crash landings in prototypes that did not pass muster. He also earned a university degree in electrical engineering. Leap-frogging between Berkeley and the Willow Grove Base (PA), he wooed Hatboro native Jerry Kratz. They married in 1948, raised three kids and last year marked a 70th wedding anniversary. The nonagenarian groom offered advice for a long marriage: "be away from home as much as possible," he joked. Indeed, military postings to Japan, Morocco, the Philippines, France -- and his civilian career as a World Airways pilot -- meant many long separations for the Pefleys. 

In 1983, the pilot retired to his Rockin' KP (Kratz-Pefley) Ranch and resumed farm boy chores. Community endeavors included his 42-year support of the Carmichael Chamber of Commerce; board membership for Carmichael Park District and nine decades of fidelity to his church. He offered a wide smile while bicycling neighborhood streets; while lunching with his wife at La Bou or laboring (in lederhosen shorts) among grapevines his ancestors had planted on Palm Drive. Jack Pefley quips were legend and -- like those of many Greatest Generation survivors -- their punchlines were seldom politically correct.

As his health declined, Jack and Jerry moved to Carmichael’s Eskaton Village and recently, to Mercy McMahon Terrace in Sacramento. A few weeks ago, the man of God cheerfully told friends he would soon be in heaven. He left them days later. “Dad’s only complaint was that he would have preferred to die in Carmichael,” says his daughter, Christine Mayer. “He was a Carmichael boy, through and through.”

Jack Pefley is survived by his wife Jerry, children John, Christine, and Patricia, and three grandchildren. His memorial will be celebrated at the Sacramento Valley National Cemetery (Dixon) on March 1 at 1pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Carmichael Park Foundation or Sacramento Valley National Cemetery.

...Read More!  
  |